William Wilson, of the Navajo Nation makes wet plate collodion portraits

 

Monroe Gallery of Photography: William Wilson, of the Navajo Nation, is making his own kind of history, by using wet plate collodion process to produce portraits of Native Americans

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  Second-year UNM law student Michelle Cook has her photo taken by artist William Wilson. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)   

Second-year UNM law student Michelle Cook has her photo taken by artist William Wilson. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)
 

William Wilson, of the Navajo Nation, is making his own kind of history, by using an old-style process to produce portraits of Native Americans.
Wilson held a public portrait studio this month on the University of New Mexico campus, using a large-format camera and the historic wet plate collodion process.
“The particular beauty of this old photographic process references a bygone era and the historic images that continue to contribute to society’s collective understanding of Native American people,” according to a news release.

 William Wilson develops a tintype as part of his collection of Native American portraits. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)  Wilson’s work will be on display at the  Maxwell Museum at UNM   through Jan. 31

William Wilson develops a tintype as part of his collection of Native American portraits. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)

Wilson’s work will be on display at the Maxwell Museum at UNM through Jan. 31

  These are some of the images created by photographer William Wilson. His work will be on display through Jan. 31 at the Maxwell Museum on the UNM campus. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)

These are some of the images created by photographer William Wilson. His work will be on display through Jan. 31 at the Maxwell Museum on the UNM campus. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)